Pupil Premium Grant

All schools are allocated a proportion of their funding from central government called the Pupil Premium. The main pupil premium funding allocated to a school is based on the number of pupils who currently qualify for Free School Meals (FSM), or have qualified for FSM at any point in the last 6 years, Looked after Children and children adopted after 2005. The school also receives a smaller amount of pupil premium funding for children of services families.


The government has empowered schools to decide how best to use this funding to raise the performance of pupils eligible for the pupil premium and to close the achievement and attainment gap between them and their peers. Research shows that there is a persistent gap nationally for both attainment and achievement between eligible pupils and all other pupils.
At Westhoughton High School the Headteacher, staff and governors are keenly aware of their responsibility for the welfare and academic progress of our eligible pupils. We are ambitious for our eligible pupils and we work hard to deliver high-quality lessons, as well as well targeted support and challenge, so that the gap in attainment and achievement closes between those pupils and their peers, and so that all have the opportunity to make the most of life in modern Britain. We are proud of our comprehensive ethos where all pupils can be successful, regardless of their ability or their social or cultural background, and have the opportunity to achieve more than they first thought possible.


As a school we have allocated the pupil premium to support a variety of strategies in class and in a wider context to promote social inclusion and accelerate learning and progress for eligible pupils.


Overview of the school

Number of pupils and pupil premium grant (PPG) recieved
Total number of pupils (11-16) on roll853
Total Number of 'FSM ever 6' Students231
Total number of service children5
Total number of CLA students6

Amount of PPG received per pupil

£935
Total amount of PPG received£233,485


Whole School

Year GroupMaleFemaleTotal
710387190
88271153
98775162
108191172
119779176
Overall total450403853


Pupil Premium Cohort

Year GroupMaleFemaleTotal
7302353
8281846
9261642
10302151
11272350
Overall total141104242


WHS Pupil Premium Evaluation Academic Year 2015-2016

Pupil Premium Team

  • Mr P Hart – Headteacher
  • Ms C Edgar – Deputy Headteacher, Student Support & Progress Pupil Premium Champion
  • Miss J Bach – Deputy Headtacher, Teaching & learning
  • Mrs J Torrance – Assistant Headteacher, SEN
  • Mrs J Hongkins– (English leader of Learning)
  • Dr C Atherton (Maths Leader of Learning)
  • Mrs C Burton (Science Leader of Learning)
  • Mrs A Butler – Business Manager
  • Student Progress and Support leaders


Pupil Premium

Pupil Premium funding is capital which is additional to main school funding.

The purpose of the Pupil Premium is that it is deployed by schools to narrow the attainment gap between pupils from low income families and their peers by ensuring that this funding reaches the pupils who need it most. Schools have the freedom to spend this funding as they see fit based upon their knowledge of pupil needs. Pupil Premium funding is received for those who have been in receipt of Free School Meals (FSM) at some point in the past 6 years and children who have been “in Care” continuously for more than 6 months.

In order that they may achieve their full potential, each student eligible for Pupil Premium funding may require, in addition to the core offerings a school may deliver, a bespoke set of interventions, opportunities and support based on their individual needs and circumstances. The students for whom the school receives the Pupil Premium are not a homogenous group of young people: Westhoughton High school therefore uses this funding to address student needs which are inevitably diverse; for example, some of these students may not have faced economic hardship for a number of years whereas others may be presently in a low-income family environment. Each year a detailed analysis of the academic profile of those students for whom the school receives the Pupil Premium is conducted, together with an evaluation of their individual needs and assessment of potential barriers to learning so that use of this funding has endeavoured to ensure that we have treated all children as individuals. However, our evaluation of the success of the school’s use of the Pupil Premium funding is focused less on the journey individual students take through the school, but more on their ultimate levels of achievement of this group.


2015-16 Outcomes

Achievement: In the majority of cases, the average academic profile on entry to the school of those students for whom the school receives the pupil Premium is significantly lower than that of the full cohort. The assessment of the impact of Pupil Premium expenditure within school primarily focused on the progress achieved rather than the raw attainment of these students.

In 2015-16 we focused our interventions on those currently in receipt of Free School meals, rather than the wider Pupil premium group (those who have been in receipt of free school meals at any time in the last 6 years as this is where we perceived we most needed to close out gap. The impact of the use of this funding can be seen below:

IMPACT: 

Attainment of PP students at Westhoughton High School (2012-2016)

Measure

2012

2012 v 2013

2013

2013 v 2014

2014

2014 v 2015

2015

2015 v 2016*

2016

2015 WHS v National

2014 National

5ACEM

26%

16%

42%

-5%

37%

7%

44%

7%

51%

15%

36%

5AC

63%

-3%

60%

-14%

46%

7%

53%

6%

59%

14%

45%

5AG

89%

3%

92%

4%

96%

1%

97%

-1%

96%

9%

87%

EBacc

0%

0%

0%

4%

4%

1%

5%

-1%

4%

-7%

11%

En AC

33%

13%

46%

2%

48%

15%

63%

0%

63%

12%

51%

Ma AC

39%

13%

52%

-4%

48%

2%

50%

5%

55%

6%

49%

En 3LoP

47%

5%

52%

10%

62%

-1%

61%

12%

73%

16%

57%

Ma 3LoP

40%

14%

54%

-1%

53%

-5%

48%

12%

60%

11%

49%

APS

368.3

-7.2

361.1

-77.5

283.6

24.4

308.0

10

318

23

295

CAPS

284.5

6.1

290.6

-22.2

268.4

18.6

287.0

8

295

35

260

En 4LoP

 -

 -

8%

9%

17%

6%

23%

6%

29%

 -

 -

Ma 4LoP

 -

 -

13%

2%

15%

-3%

12%

14%

26%

 -

 -

            
  

Gaps between PP students and non-PP students (2012-2016)

Measure

2012

2012 v 2013

2013

2013 v 2014

2014

2014 v 2015

2015

2015 v 2016*

2016

2016 WHS v National

2015 National

5ACEM

-41%

24%

-17%

-7%

-24%

-1%

-25%

7%

-18%

9%

-27%

5AC

-26%

4%

-22%

-3%

-25%

3%

-22%

8%

-14%

13%

-27%

5AG

-7%

2%

-5%

2%

-3%

1%

-2%

0%

-2%

7%

-9%

EBacc

-3%

-3%

-6%

-3%

-9%

-8%

-17%

8%

-9%

8%

-17%

En AC

-46%

20%

-26%

-1%

-27%

9%

-18%

0%

-18%

5%

-23%

Ma AC

-32%

15%

-17%

-8%

-25%

-1%

-26%

3%

-23%

2%

-25%

En 3LoP

-30%

10%

-20%

7%

-13%

2%

-11%

1%

-10%

7%

-17%

Ma 3LoP

-22%

12%

-10%

-9%

-19%

1%

-18%

2%

-16%

7%

-23%

APS

-86.4

27.8

-58.6

-10.6

-69.2

18.2

-51.0

5

-46

52

-98

CAPS

-56.8

10.7

-46.1

-12.8

-58.9

16.9

-42.0

3

-39

28

-67

En 4LoP

 -

 -

-13%

-8%

-21%

11%

-10%

-7%

-17%

 -

 -

Ma 4LoP

 -

 -

-1%

-12%

-13%

5%

-8%

0%

-8%

 -

 -

  • Predictions based on Data entry 4 at the close of year 10.

At Westhoughton High School approximately 12% of students in Years 7-11 are currently in receipt of Free School Meals and 5 are Children in Care. For the financial year 2015/16 the school received a total of £245,835 in Pupil Premium funding and a plan of our spending was placed on the school website.


How did we use the funds last academic year and what impact did it have? (Please see individual student tracking document for further evaluations.)


Westhoughton High School allocated the Pupil Premium funding in the key areas of Learning Support, Student Welfare, Curriculum Staffing to provide quality first teaching and Targeted Strategies & Initiatives. In 2015-16 the breakdown in expenditure was as follows:


 

£

Learning Support / Staffing and initiatives

Staffing and initiatives

The School has strengthened leadership in English and mathematics in order to provide additional Numeracy and Literacy programmes throughout the academic year. Some of this extra time can be defined as smaller class sizes, 1:1 support, breakfast clubs, catch-up sessions, and extraction from core subjects, C/D border-line interventions, booster classes, mentoring, alternative Curriculum for pupils below a level 4 in year 7 through our Primary model group and intensive Numeracy & Literacy intervention. Impact is measured on student progress each term through our Data entries.  Maths & English subject areas and our Learning centre developed structured intervention plans and this has had a measured impact on student attainment. In addition to this the school also employs a number of other staff to work with the Pupil Premium cohort. These include The Student Progress Leaders (SPL’s) who rigorously monitor the Pupil Premium group and re-track individuals as appropriate through interventions and mentoring programmes, the Student Support Leaders, who support confidence in learning and more general pastoral well-being, the Deputy Headteacher (Support and progress) who is directly responsible for Looked After Children (CLA), the Assistant Headteacher, SENCO  who is responsible for those with special educational needs and the strategic development of our learning centre, an Integrated working officer who works with students and families around attendance and wider issues, Careers guidance staff, and administration staff responsible for the tracking and monitoring of attendance and progress of the Pupil Premium group specifically. We ensure Literacy work and Numeracy initiatives takes place in form time through form tutors  and Inclusion Teaching Staff, maintaining the effective literacy and numeracy programmes that are in place in our Learning centre to support students, additional Booster English and Maths lessons for Year 11 students- targeted intervention using data analysis. During Academic year 2015/6 new maths scheme of work were embedded with more emphasis on the use of everyday maths and functional skills. Staff have been suitably trained and focus areas have been the use of marking to inform feedback and progress and the use of assessment to support learning. Staff implemented small group Catch-Up Numeracy withdrawal sessions with 30 Year 11 students enabled students to improve numeracy skills.  Please see Maths Leader of learning reviews for further information.

Additional strategies have included the following:

Catch Up Numeracy

Small group Intervention

Reading books for Year 7 forms

Primary model group

Paired reading

Numeracy challenge trips

Form Quiz to improve literacy, numeracy and knowledge of current affairs

Homework clubs

Breakfast club

KS4 intervention

 

CLA Intervention

IMPACT: In school academic gaps closing and gaps closing against national figures across most accountability measures – see grid above.

 

£245,000

Student Welfare

Student Support Team providing very high levels of personalised support to the school’s most challenging youngsters from this group who experience significant barriers to their learning.  This work is particularly relevant in supporting students who may have behavioral, emotional and/or social difficulties to engage more positively with school and their learning with the aim of optimising their chances of fulfilling their potential. Improving contact with the more hard to reach families through the work of the Inclusion Team, having direct impact on improving children’s attendance and levels of engagement

Funding an Attendance /Integrated working Officer who focuses on both supporting and challenging students and their parents when their attendance is less than 95%

Part-funding Behaviour support workers who supports intervention programmes supporting students who may have behavioural, emotional and/or social difficulties to engage more positively with school and their learning

We have embedded a mentor scheme that is effectively using Student Progress Leaders and form tutors to mentor and support our FSM students. This initiative involves one-to-one mentoring with targets set to improve progress and attendance. Other support such as additional numeracy & literacy, and homework assistance is also offered through our homework clubs. Impact is measured every term following data entries and progress is assessed in removing barriers to learning in these crucial areas.

We have introduced a Peer Mentoring initiative, financing the training of staff to ensure sustainability and the training of peer mentors to ensure that they have the requisite knowledge, skills and understanding to carry out their role effectively.

IMPACT: Pupils’ attitudes to all aspects of their learning are consistently positive. These positive attitudes have a good impact on the progress they make. Fixed Term Exclusions in line with national and are carefully monitored around groups. Repeat exclusion are reducing over time which shows we are better managing and supporting student groups and individuals – where interventions fail,  appropriate and timely  provision is sought through behaviour support. Attendance is high as compared to national figures with no concerns in groups. Persistent absence is below average.

 

£321.000

Curriculum Focus of PPG Spending
This has included the funding of revision guides for all FSM pupils, additional Period 6 lessons, smaller class sizes, additional staff training to improve the quality of teaching and learning.
IMPACT: See below – gap closing for FSM group


Student Group
(5ACEM)

National
Gap (2015)

Last Year’s
Gap

Predicted Gap (DE4)

Actual

Gap 2016

Free School Meals

(FSM – NonFSM)

-27%

-25%

-14%

-18%

 

£119.00

Peripatetic Music tuition

The continuation of this scheme allows all our students to take up tuition of a particular music instrument. Staffs are employed to deliver this initiative in such areas as Voice, Woodwind, Drums & Percussion, Brass, Guitar, Keyboard & Piano and Strings. This allows a number of Pupil Premium students to access music tuition in and after school. Funding is also used to pay for entry for instrumental exams which are accredited.

Impact

Inclusive opportunities for creative talents to develop irrespective of financial position of parents/carers. Students able to take part in productions and confidence increased.

Accessed by:

in 2012 (10% of school population)

in 2013-14 (11% of school population)

in 2014-5 (10% of school population

in 2015-6 (11% of school population)

 

£10,000

Supporting Students on enrichment trips / Rewards
Funding has been used to support students on departmental enrichment trips. Funding has contributed to a number of students attending such trips as the Paris trip, the Skiing trip to Austria, social skills adventure trips on Enrichment days etc.

Impact

During academic year 2015 / 2016, 6 students received financial assistance which enabled them to access various enrichment and educational school trips.  Funding was also used to support attendance of some PP students at rewards events, such as the school prom or on rewards trips. The outcome of their attendance on these trips improved not only social development but also self-confidence, self-esteem and attainment.  This proved to be an experience that motivated students to be more engaged and pro-active about their progress in school.  A number of families have been supported around items of uniform. Due to this financial assistance parental communications have also improved – see the school’s re-accreditation report from the leading parent partnership Award (LPPA).

£1,000

Total Expenditure

 

£696,000


PUPIL PREMIUM 2016 / 2017

Planned Use of Pupil Premium Funding

There are currently 113students in receipt of Free School Meals (FSM) at Westhoughton High School and 242 pupils are registered as pupil premium and have been on FSM within the last 6 years (FSM ever 6).

Westhoughton High School intends using the allocated funding to raise the attainment and develop areas such as attendance, behaviour, numeracy, literacy, self – confidence and engagement within our Pupil Premium cohort. This report outlines our planned strategy to support our students in 2016-7.

Due to the numbers of students in receipt of FSM we have received the following amount of Pupil Premium Funding:



Academic Year

Number of Pupil Premium Pupils



Amount of funding allocated



2013 - 2014



272



£253,800



2014 - 2015



266



£249,910



2015 - 2016



261



£245,835



2016 - 2017



242



£223,485



Planned Expenditure

Innovative Technology

The Pupil Premium team working alongside the English department have purchased several Kindles. This provides some students with a new and exciting method of reading. They can be used to support classroom work, small group booster reading groups and 1:1 reading groups. Some PPG students have been provided with a personal Kindle (see student tracker document). Evidence will be the progress in English reading attainment. This also allows our students to have access to recently published materials.


The school has invested in Iamlearning, GCSEpod and Mymaths, on line packages to enable pupil premium students to have access to materials for revision at home. We invested in a Show my Homework initiative so that students have improved access to on line homework in order to engage our students in independent learning and this will continue. We have move to an electronic seating plan package, enabling staff to seat PPG (and other) students using the optimum arrangements to ensure student progress and this will now be extended to incorporate information on student behaviour to facilitate and further improve behaviour management and expectations. The school library has developed so that there is computer access to student packages and this is available to students before and after school, as well as during the school day.


We plan to continue to improve our parental engagement through use of a texting system to improve our home-school communication and will extend this communication to incorporate more aspects around teaching and learning. We have invested in an on line booking system for Parents’ evening and introduced additional parental information evenings and points of contact- parental feedback has been extremely positive and this will continue in the next school year. All these incentives have much improved our parental engagement with teaching and learning initiatives.

Budgeted Cost: £12,000


Paired reading

Our paired reading project aims to build confidence and self-esteem through shared reading, to create a culture of reading for pleasure throughout the school. We hold weekly reading groups and one-to-ones with students, particularly those in receipt of Free School Meals and those with a reading age below 9.6 in years 7 & 8. This is part of our wider peer mentoring work. We will use PPG funding to ensure we have appropriate reading materials to encourage and develop students’ reading skills.

Budgeted Cost: £101,000


Mentoring and Student welfare

We will continue to employ Student Support and Progress leaders to mentor students around appropriate behaviour for learning and academic success and have increased this team to ensure students are fully supported. Our attendance and family liaison office will continue to ensure that attendance levels remain high and that vulnerable children are supported with any necessary ‘stepping stone’ initiatives. Our SENCO will offer bespoke timetables including alternative curriculum packages according to need. Our peer mentoring scheme will continue this year. These measure ensure that all students have access to support at a number of levels.
Budgeted Cost: £310,000


Numeracy and Literacy ‘Catch up’

Catch up Numeracy and Literacy has statistical evidence of their impact at an individual student level, Westhoughton High School will improve the training for our learning centre staff team to allow structured one-to-one interventions proven to significantly improve the achievement of learners who find Literacy and Numeracy difficult.
Budgeted Cost: £33,000


Numeracy & Literacy – ‘Learning to learn’

Some KS4 students falling below target grades in English and Maths have accessed an intense yet exciting initiative last year. This helped to develop learner’s revision skills and abilities in basic Numeracy and Literacy and was led by highly qualified external staff. Several of our own staff in key subject areas have now trained to deliver this model of accelerated learning. This will continue in 2016-17

Budgeted Cost: £3,000


Easter camp – Year 11

During academic year 2016/7, we will run a further Easter camp to participate in structured Maths and English revision in preparation for GCSE examinations. These sessions, led by qualified teaching staff, allowed students to develop areas of weakness that has been identified previously in the classroom and through mock examinations and tests. We will also provide our FSM students with free revision materials and bespoke guides.
Budgeted Cost: £4,000


Uniform Support

Student Support leaders have been using the funds to provide certain students with uniform and other essential equipment to maximise learning potential and help improve attendance, avoiding any embarrassment due to hardship issues. This includes the Student Support Leaders using some funds to provide school shoes to a number of students. This initiative will continue

Budgeted Cost: £1,000


Period 0 and Periods 6 &7

Period 0 and periods 6 & 7 are now used as additional contact time for students that might be falling behind in various subjects or for students that wish to extend their school day to do additional work after school. This additional time allows students to complete coursework and tasks set by members of staff during the normal school day or may be used as revision booster sessions. Additional materials and light refreshments are provided for students.
Budgeted Cost: £2,000


Breakfast & Homework clubs

These clubs support or PPG students to ensure they are ready to start each school day in a positive way, prepared for learning. At homework club, students have access to a member of staff and ICT.

Budgeted cost: £1,000


Primary Cluster links

The maths department have implemented a scheme designed for year 5 pupils who are moving from level 5 to level 6. This programme combines numeracy skills in an exciting way, using collaboration and problem solving activities. The overall goal of this exciting programme is to further develop pupil’s numeracy skills in a new and different way and thus ease transition. Other departments also developed primary links through a variety of curricular activities, including primary sports, English, drama and science. Our staff visit the primary schools as part of our transition activities and we also operate an annual taster day. There has also been a behaviour training event run by the school to support our primary colleagues with the management of vulnerable students who have identified behaviour needs. Our primary feeders also attend school shows and wider events to support transition.
Budgeted Cost: £8,500


Summer School

Over the past 5 Academic years, Westhoughton High School has delivered several successful Summer and Easter holiday courses with a focus on Numeracy, Literacy, and Physical Education. The results have been outstanding and a very pleasing amount of pupil premium pupils attended for the full duration. We will continue and build upon previous holiday courses this Academic year.

Budgeted Cost: Separate funding


Student Specific Interventions

Student specific interventions will be continually monitored using the school Provision Map.

Budgeted Cost: £232,000


Parental engagement

Additionally, we have sought parental views by the method of questionnaires asking what activities parents would like to be involved in. From this feedback, we have introduced some exciting and innovative programmes such as evening sessions around helping your child with maths and revision, e safety, and we have extended our Flightpath information evenings. This work has been recognised in our LPPA (Leading Parent Partnership) award. On our Flightpath information evenings, we make a particular effort to ensure the attendance of the parents and family members of some pupil premium students through follow up and phone calls. The evenings have been well received and feedback was impressive. Parents/carers were provided with the opportunity to part in numeracy sessions to assist their child’s learning and some careers sessions. We enjoy some light refreshments during the evening. In addition we run a Your Futures day for year 9 parents around option choices, again particularly focussing on PPG engagement.

Budgeted cost: £6,000